The Happiest Birthday Ever Book Review

One of my favorite things about being a teacher is that kids always surprise me. I’ve seen students share their lunch with a friend who dropped theirs in a puddle on a field trip. These little acts of kindness warm my heart.

The Happiest Birthday Ever, by Stephanie Berger, is a fantastic story about children participating in random acts of kindness which who shows young readers that it’s all about the little things in life.

Ben is turning seven. He tells his mom what he wants for his birthday (candy, a treasure hunt), but most of all he wants to make people happy. Ben invites his closest friends to his party with a very unique invitation that has RAOK written on them, and the children are asked to bring a stuffed animal. When they arrive at Ben’s house on the day of the party, Ben reveals that they will be doing seven random acts of kindness to celebrate Ben’s birthday.

The acts of kindness are truly thoughtful and realistic. The children bring the stuffed animals to a police station for officers to give to little kids who are upset and scared. Ben and his friends create a treasure hunt for kids at the park. My personal favorite was when the children made cards to send to soldiers.

There are so many things I like about this book that I don’t even know where to start. The writing style of this book is perfect for doing a class read aloud. When I first saw RAOK in the pictures I actually thought this would be the perfect time to stop and ask readers to make a some guess about what RAOK stands for. I like the consistency with the pictures on the left and the text on the right. The sentence structure allows the story to flow naturally without choppiness (perfect for reading aloud). I love that the pictures really do explain what the text is saying on each page, especially for those students who need that visual to help with comprehension.

I am also a HUGE fan of the acts of kindness mentioned in the book. They are ones that kids of all ages can do, they don’t require much money, and they don’t take too much time. With every act of kindness, Ben and his friends placed cards with the act to explain their purpose. The author was generous enough to provide copies of those cards in the back of the book for children to use.

It’s clear that the overall theme of this picture book is happiness. Not only do Ben and his friends make strangers happy with their acts, but they each feel happy knowing they did something kind. This just gives me the warm and fuzzies.

I think this book can be used with students in grades K-3. I would highly recommend making it a read aloud activity for character education or to help celebrate Veteran’s Day. Burger provides readers with a link about more information for sending thank you cards to active military members, and a percentage of sales will be donated to Make A Wish Foundation to help children smile.

To purchase this book click here.

 

Writing Assessments Offered by Little Reading Coach

As a teacher and tutor over the last ten years, I’ve guided students with learning how to write an effective paragraph to crafting their college essay. Strong writing skills are imperative in today’s society. Earlier this week I posted reading assessments Little Reading Coach offers (click here), and today I’m sharing writing assessments.

Virtual Writing Evaluations for Grades 6-12
Each evaluation includes a write up that can be shared with schools and teachers

Quick Write
*on demand writing (paragraph or essay depending on student’s grade level)
*Evaluation of the following skills:
-Content (writing on task, answer the prompt, textual evidence)
-Punctuation
-Spelling
-Sentence Structure

The Basics
*on demand reading (grade level text) and writing (paragraph or essay depending on student’s grade level)
*Evaluation of the following skills:
-Content (writing on task, answer the prompt, textual evidence)
-Punctuation
-Spelling
-Sentence Structure
*1 hour Zoom conference to discuss findings

The Works
*on demand reading (grade level text) and writing (paragraph or essay depending on student’s grade level)
*Evaluation of the following skills:
-Content (writing on task, answer the prompt, textual evidence)
-Punctuation
-Spelling
-Sentence Structure
*Basic grammar diagnostic (knowledge of parts of speech, sentence structure)
*1 hour Zoom conference to discuss findings

All writing evaluations are created by a certified Teacher of English (K-12) and Reading Specialist (P-12).
​Little Reading Coach can conduct reading and writing assessments, but can not officially diagnose any reading/writing disabilities.

For more information click here.

Reading Assessments Offered by Little Reading Coach

Earlier this month I shared a post about the virtual services Little Reading Coach offers (click here for the post). Today I wanted to give you a little more insight into the reading assessment services that Little Reading Coach offers.

CTOPP-2

The Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing (CTOPP) is used to assess reading related phonological skills. These skills include: phonological awareness, phonological memory, and rapid naming. A deficit in phonological awareness is often viewed as an indication of a reading disability or dyslexia. The assessment can be given to individuals from ages 4-24. If an individual has a deficit in one or more areas, he or she may have more difficulty reading.

Test administration usually takes about an hour (give or take). It provides data for parents that is not included in DRAs or running records conducted by classroom teachers.

Qualitative Reading Inventory- 6

This is an authentic assessment of a student’s reading abilities. According to *Pearson, “This popular resource provides graded word lists and numerous passages designed to assess a student’s oral reading accuracy, rate of reading, and comprehension of passages read orally and silently.”

Test administration usually takes about 1.5 hours, depending on age of the student. This assessment is used for determining reading level and reading comprehension.

 

Little Reading Coach offers both of these assessments virtually using Zoom. Students need to be in a quiet environment with access to a webcam, and preferably the use of headphones. ​Little Reading Coach can conduct reading assessments, but can not officially diagnose any reading/writing disabilities. 

For more information click here.

 

*Leslie, L., & Leslie & Caldwell. (n.d.). Qualitative Reading Inventory. Retrieved from https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-education/product/Leslie-Qualitative-Reading-Inventory-6th-Edition/9780134161020.html.

DyslexiaLand Book Review

A few months ago I saw a book on Facebook that I knew I had to read. I bought it and added it to the TBR pile, where it sat for a few months. I wanted to make sure I dedicated a solid chunk of time to reading it since it’s not the usual YA novel that tends to call my name.

DyslexiaLand: A Field Guide for Parents of Children with Dyslexia, by Cheri Rae, is a must have book for parents and educators about the realities of dyslexia.

First and foremost, this guide is written by a mom with a dyslexic son AND a dyslexia advocate. I love this on so many levels. Rae gives us the mom-to-mom heart to heart in a way that is supportive and engaging. There is no pity party, but rather advice to provide families with comfort and guidance.

The guide does not read like a textbook, and the organization and structure are insanely user-friendly. I love how I can easily flip to exactly what I’m looking for and not feel overwhelmed with text on a page. One of my favorite aspects is the acronyms list of educational terminology. Even as a seasoned English teacher and Reading Specialist, this is an extremely handy list that I have book marked for future IEP meetings.

I was definitely interacting with this text while I was reading. I have underlines, hearts, stars and exclamation points all over the place. Rae totally hit a HUGE nail on the head when she discussed that teachers do not have the proper training or professional development for supporting students with dyslexia. As I’ve mentioned in We Need to Talk…About Dyslexia, I was one of those teachers who lacked training. My knowledge of dyslexia and appropriate teaching strategies were pretty much non-existent until I started my Orton-Gillingham journey. In the public and charter schools I’ve worked in over the years,  I have never had any training for dyslexia, which supports the point Rae brings up.

I have also been in about 25 IEP meetings since August, and have seen the term “specific learning disability” and ideas like reading comprehension and fluency associated with it. Yet, the “d” word has never been uttered in any of these meetings. I’ve been very intrigued with IEPs recently (probably from being part of so many), and I find it fascinating that I have not seen dyslexia ever mentioned in one. So needless to say, I was all over the section on IEPs. For the first time ever I completely understood what was being discussed about these legal documents. Rae’s explanations are crystal clear and makes IEPs less confusing (which is not an easy feat).

Middle school is my jam. Always has been and always will be. However, one of the biggest obstacles I’ve faced is the belief that learning to read only happens in elementary school. This is not the case for all students. Rae makes it a point to discuss dyslexia from elementary school through high school (woot woot!). The transition to-do lists are super awesome and spot on.

I also appreciated how Rae discussed that Orton-Gillingham tutoring can be done online. As a virtual teacher and tutor, it’s often difficult for people to wrap their heads around online education, let alone embrace it. As research has proven, OG is a successful approach when working with dyslexia. Whether the instruction is given in a school environment, at a center, or one-on-one with a tutor in person or online, the goal is to help students with reading.

Overall, I am absolutely over the moon about this guide. I believe it should be in the hands of every educator. Yes, every math, science, consumer arts, woodworking teacher, etc. should read this book. Literacy and reading impacts all areas of life. It provides parents with a sense of direction in tackling DyslexiaLand. It equips parents for the meetings, discussions, and realities of navigating the educational system.

To purchase this amazing guide click here.

Dyslexia Awareness Video

It’s hard to believe that October is almost over. It’s been absolutely incredible to see teachers, parents and special education advocates bring awareness to dyslexia this month with social media posts, promotions on Orton-Gillingham courses and products, and sharing articles and resources.

I had the pleasure of collaborating with Christopher Gordon, author of Timothy’s Lesson in Good Values, and EvenTech Corp, to create a Dyslexia Awareness video. It was super exciting to be part of this project with amazing people.

 

This video is also perfect to use for an anti-bullying lesson or activity. It can be used in character education lessons for students in grades K-6.

 

Student Testimonial: What One Student Says About Little Reading Coach

I loved working with kids in the classroom, but tutoring one-on-one allowed me to really bond with kids. I’ve been extremely fortunate to have worked with a student since his freshman year of high school, especially while he’s taking midterms during his first year of grad school.

When I first met Austin, he didn’t know what a verb was. He is without a doubt my biggest success story, and I am beyond proud of him. This is what he has to say about Little Reading Coach:

“I can honestly say that without Christine’s help I would not have fared nearly as well as I did in high school, in college, nor would I realistically have had a chance of going to grad school. There is a clear and obvious jump in my writing level from before and after sessions with her. And, it is not an overstatement to say that her influence, and tutelage on my personal essays when applying for college, played a large role in my admission.  As well as raising the quality of the product, the method in which she works with her students also is unmatched compared to any other tutoring service that I’ve encountered. And anyone who does decide to use her is going to be better off for it.” Austin G.

For more information about Little Reading Coach’s services, check out this blog post.

To enroll in virtual tutoring sessions, click here

Natalya Loves Candy Book Review

I’ve been on a quest for some super cute Halloween books for Miss Molly recently. Today’s book popped up in my Facebook newsfeed and I had a feeling it was just what I was looking for.

Natalya Loves Candy, by Rebecca Yee, is an adorable picture book about a little girl’s adventure on Halloween night.

From a structure standpoint, I love how there isn’t a lot of text on the pages. The illustrations are so cute, so the little bit of text keeps everything balanced. The colors pop and have a nice fall/Halloween feel. I truly LOVE the rhyme scheme of this book. My voice naturally changed in all the right places, which made the story more engaging and enjoyable.

Natalya is a little girl who is excited to go trick or treating with her friends. She is dressed up as a witch, and has a great time getting candy with her friends. While she’s out, a black cat crosses her path, and she falls in love with him. She takes the cat home, names him Candy, and hopes that her mommy will let her keep him.

I love how this book has some of the traditional aspects of Halloween (witch costume, black cat), but I really enjoyed the play on candy. Yes, Natalya collected candy trick or treating, but the addition of Candy made the story even sweeter. The creativity of this element was unpredictable in a good way, and made the text more memorable.

I think this would be a great read loud for parents and teachers of preschool and early elementary children.

To purchase the book click here.