Reading Assessments Offered by Little Reading Coach

Earlier this month I shared a post about the virtual services Little Reading Coach offers (click here for the post). Today I wanted to give you a little more insight into the reading assessment services that Little Reading Coach offers.

CTOPP-2

The Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing (CTOPP) is used to assess reading related phonological skills. These skills include: phonological awareness, phonological memory, and rapid naming. A deficit in phonological awareness is often viewed as an indication of a reading disability or dyslexia. The assessment can be given to individuals from ages 4-24. If an individual has a deficit in one or more areas, he or she may have more difficulty reading.

Test administration usually takes about an hour (give or take). It provides data for parents that is not included in DRAs or running records conducted by classroom teachers.

Qualitative Reading Inventory- 6

This is an authentic assessment of a student’s reading abilities. According to *Pearson, “This popular resource provides graded word lists and numerous passages designed to assess a student’s oral reading accuracy, rate of reading, and comprehension of passages read orally and silently.”

Test administration usually takes about 1.5 hours, depending on age of the student. This assessment is used for determining reading level and reading comprehension.

 

Little Reading Coach offers both of these assessments virtually using Zoom. Students need to be in a quiet environment with access to a webcam, and preferably the use of headphones. ​Little Reading Coach can conduct reading assessments, but can not officially diagnose any reading/writing disabilities. 

For more information click here.

 

*Leslie, L., & Leslie & Caldwell. (n.d.). Qualitative Reading Inventory. Retrieved from https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-education/product/Leslie-Qualitative-Reading-Inventory-6th-Edition/9780134161020.html.

DyslexiaLand Book Review

A few months ago I saw a book on Facebook that I knew I had to read. I bought it and added it to the TBR pile, where it sat for a few months. I wanted to make sure I dedicated a solid chunk of time to reading it since it’s not the usual YA novel that tends to call my name.

DyslexiaLand: A Field Guide for Parents of Children with Dyslexia, by Cheri Rae, is a must have book for parents and educators about the realities of dyslexia.

First and foremost, this guide is written by a mom with a dyslexic son AND a dyslexia advocate. I love this on so many levels. Rae gives us the mom-to-mom heart to heart in a way that is supportive and engaging. There is no pity party, but rather advice to provide families with comfort and guidance.

The guide does not read like a textbook, and the organization and structure are insanely user-friendly. I love how I can easily flip to exactly what I’m looking for and not feel overwhelmed with text on a page. One of my favorite aspects is the acronyms list of educational terminology. Even as a seasoned English teacher and Reading Specialist, this is an extremely handy list that I have book marked for future IEP meetings.

I was definitely interacting with this text while I was reading. I have underlines, hearts, stars and exclamation points all over the place. Rae totally hit a HUGE nail on the head when she discussed that teachers do not have the proper training or professional development for supporting students with dyslexia. As I’ve mentioned in We Need to Talk…About Dyslexia, I was one of those teachers who lacked training. My knowledge of dyslexia and appropriate teaching strategies were pretty much non-existent until I started my Orton-Gillingham journey. In the public and charter schools I’ve worked in over the years,  I have never had any training for dyslexia, which supports the point Rae brings up.

I have also been in about 25 IEP meetings since August, and have seen the term “specific learning disability” and ideas like reading comprehension and fluency associated with it. Yet, the “d” word has never been uttered in any of these meetings. I’ve been very intrigued with IEPs recently (probably from being part of so many), and I find it fascinating that I have not seen dyslexia ever mentioned in one. So needless to say, I was all over the section on IEPs. For the first time ever I completely understood what was being discussed about these legal documents. Rae’s explanations are crystal clear and makes IEPs less confusing (which is not an easy feat).

Middle school is my jam. Always has been and always will be. However, one of the biggest obstacles I’ve faced is the belief that learning to read only happens in elementary school. This is not the case for all students. Rae makes it a point to discuss dyslexia from elementary school through high school (woot woot!). The transition to-do lists are super awesome and spot on.

I also appreciated how Rae discussed that Orton-Gillingham tutoring can be done online. As a virtual teacher and tutor, it’s often difficult for people to wrap their heads around online education, let alone embrace it. As research has proven, OG is a successful approach when working with dyslexia. Whether the instruction is given in a school environment, at a center, or one-on-one with a tutor in person or online, the goal is to help students with reading.

Overall, I am absolutely over the moon about this guide. I believe it should be in the hands of every educator. Yes, every math, science, consumer arts, woodworking teacher, etc. should read this book. Literacy and reading impacts all areas of life. It provides parents with a sense of direction in tackling DyslexiaLand. It equips parents for the meetings, discussions, and realities of navigating the educational system.

To purchase this amazing guide click here.

Dyslexia Awareness Video

It’s hard to believe that October is almost over. It’s been absolutely incredible to see teachers, parents and special education advocates bring awareness to dyslexia this month with social media posts, promotions on Orton-Gillingham courses and products, and sharing articles and resources.

I had the pleasure of collaborating with Christopher Gordon, author of Timothy’s Lesson in Good Values, and EvenTech Corp, to create a Dyslexia Awareness video. It was super exciting to be part of this project with amazing people.

 

This video is also perfect to use for an anti-bullying lesson or activity. It can be used in character education lessons for students in grades K-6.

 

Student Testimonial: What One Student Says About Little Reading Coach

I loved working with kids in the classroom, but tutoring one-on-one allowed me to really bond with kids. I’ve been extremely fortunate to have worked with a student since his freshman year of high school, especially while he’s taking midterms during his first year of grad school.

When I first met Austin, he didn’t know what a verb was. He is without a doubt my biggest success story, and I am beyond proud of him. This is what he has to say about Little Reading Coach:

“I can honestly say that without Christine’s help I would not have fared nearly as well as I did in high school, in college, nor would I realistically have had a chance of going to grad school. There is a clear and obvious jump in my writing level from before and after sessions with her. And, it is not an overstatement to say that her influence, and tutelage on my personal essays when applying for college, played a large role in my admission.  As well as raising the quality of the product, the method in which she works with her students also is unmatched compared to any other tutoring service that I’ve encountered. And anyone who does decide to use her is going to be better off for it.” Austin G.

For more information about Little Reading Coach’s services, check out this blog post.

To enroll in virtual tutoring sessions, click here

Natalya Loves Candy Book Review

I’ve been on a quest for some super cute Halloween books for Miss Molly recently. Today’s book popped up in my Facebook newsfeed and I had a feeling it was just what I was looking for.

Natalya Loves Candy, by Rebecca Yee, is an adorable picture book about a little girl’s adventure on Halloween night.

From a structure standpoint, I love how there isn’t a lot of text on the pages. The illustrations are so cute, so the little bit of text keeps everything balanced. The colors pop and have a nice fall/Halloween feel. I truly LOVE the rhyme scheme of this book. My voice naturally changed in all the right places, which made the story more engaging and enjoyable.

Natalya is a little girl who is excited to go trick or treating with her friends. She is dressed up as a witch, and has a great time getting candy with her friends. While she’s out, a black cat crosses her path, and she falls in love with him. She takes the cat home, names him Candy, and hopes that her mommy will let her keep him.

I love how this book has some of the traditional aspects of Halloween (witch costume, black cat), but I really enjoyed the play on candy. Yes, Natalya collected candy trick or treating, but the addition of Candy made the story even sweeter. The creativity of this element was unpredictable in a good way, and made the text more memorable.

I think this would be a great read loud for parents and teachers of preschool and early elementary children.

To purchase the book click here.

3 Easy Ways Busy Parents Can Help Readers

The alarm goes off at 5. You shower, get ready, pack lunches, make breakfast, wake the kids up, drive to sit in the drop off line, drive to work and start a jam packed day at the office. After work you run to pick up the kids, fly to football practice then dance class, rush home to throw dinner together, go back out and pick up the kids, come back home, eat dinner, get the kids in bed, try and catch up on social media and go to sleep.

Then wake up the next day and do it all over again.

It’s amazing how much parents are trying to cram into a 24 hour period. So how can parents help their kids with reading in the midst of every day chaos?

  1. Squeeze in reading time. This may sound overwhelming. How can you possibly squeeze 20 minutes of reading in before bed every night? Easy, you don’t have to. Reading can happen anywhere at anytime. While driving to violin lessons, have an audiobook playing in the car. Keep a book in the car and have your child read it. Same thing goes while your making dinner. There are always reading moments, it’s just making sure you’re prepared for them. Keep books around the house so they are within reach.
  2. Stay up to date on what’s happening in the classroom. Technology is amazing these days. Every teacher I know has a website that is jam packed with information. They include assignments, reminders, homework, etc. Dedicate 5 minutes a day (probably around 3-4 pm) to check your child’s English class website. See what the homework is, check out when the next quiz is. Have conversations with your child about specifics from class. For instance, if they have a vocabulary quiz, have them go over the words and definitions with you while you drive, making dinner, etc.  (are you seeing a pattern here?).
  3. Stay in touch with your child’s teacher. A lot of my middle school parents would sign up for parent-teacher conferences within minutes to ensure they got a slot. During our discussions, they would mention how they didn’t want to bother me with questions if it wasn’t parent-teacher conference time. Never, ever hesitate to reach out to a teacher with a question. Your goal as a parent is to ensure your child gets an education. If you don’t understand an essay rubric, or why your child scored low on a reading comprehension quiz, reach out to the teacher. The more you understand the more you will be able to help your child.

These three quick and easy ideas do require a little bit of prep work, but they all can be done on a smart phone and on the go.

Parent Testimonial: See What One Mom is Saying about Little Reading Coach

One of my favorite aspects about working with kids is seeing their growth. Over the last ten years I’ve had the pleasure to work with sooo many kids. I’ve helped with research papers, summer reading assignments, college essays, and so much more.

For the last few years I’ve been working with two brothers on reading and writing skills. They are beyond awesome kids who always have me laughing. Here is what their mom is saying about Little Reading Coach’s tutoring services:

“Christine is an energetic, enthusiastic educator. She has been working with my two boys for a couple of years now. They are now in middle school and high school one with ADHD and one with dysgraphia. She has the skill, patience and sense of humor to manage antsy, wiggly boys who’d rather do anything but language arts work. Not only does she manage them well, they love working with her and have fun doing it. Their reading and writing skills have improved exponentially. Christine is kind, understanding and very resourceful. I have recommended her to many other parents and will continue to do so.” Chris F.

For more information on Little Reading Coach’s virtual tutoring services check out a previous blog post here.

To register for tutoring session click here.