3 No Toy & No Technology Gifts for Kids

With the holiday season right around the corner, many parents and family members are starting to think of what to get the children in their lives. A gift buyer’s first instinct is to buy a toy for a child because that’s the typical gift to give to a kid.

When I was a kid, I loved looking through the Toys R Us catalog and circling the toys I wanted. However, quite a bit has changed in 20 years. Now the majority of toys that kids want are technology based (tablets, video games, cell phones, etc).

As a parent, I’m guilty of buying Molly toys because I like them, especially if it’s Disney related. I’ve learned that there are some toys Molly will play with every day and others she will literally pick up and throw and never touch again. While toys are great, especially for helping with motor skills and using imagination, it’s okay to give kids a gift other than a toy.

  1. Books. Whenever we have a child’s birthday or holiday, I always giv1001 Things to Spot Collectione books. I make sure I know the child’s interests/hobbies and find books that match their interests. When buying books for kids get ones that will engage them. Flap books, find the objects books, books with CDs are all great ones to give as gifts. For some great book ideas head over to Usborne Books & More.
  2. Puzzles. One of the greatest things about puzzles is theUSA Puzzle variety that’s available. There are puzzles of different themes, various piece amounts, and for kids of all ages. My personal favorites for toddlers and preschoolers are Melissa and Doug wooden puzzles. The wood can endure lots of use and they can be educational or fun.
  3. Games. Similar to puzzles, there are so many different games to choose from. Many popular kids shows and movies have games (Trolls Operation, Paw Patrol Games
    Paw Patrol Pup Racers Board Game, etc.) so that is always a good starting point when trying to decide what to buy. If you have a chance, take a stroll down the game aisle at Toys R Us to see the latest games and revisit some classics.

During this holiday season don’t be afraid to give a child something that’s a little bit out of the ordinary.

Rice & Rocks Book Review

Disclaimer: I was provided a copy of this book from the author to facilitate this review. As always, all opinions are my own and are not influenced in any way. Rice & Books by Sandra L. Richards and illustrated by Megan Kayleigh Sullivan is a phenomenal book about culture and tradition.

Giovanni is a little boy who has friends coming over for dinner. His grandmother is making rice and rocks (rice and beans) and he is afraid his friends won’t like the traditional Jamaican dish. He goes on a magical ride with his parrot, Jasper, his Auntie and her dogs, and discovers how the same dish is a tradition in multiple parts of the world. The illustrations are creative with realistic facial expressions. The attention to detail and the colors are breathtaking and help the text come alive. Rice & Rocks

As a reading teacher I have discovered the lack of diverse texts in classrooms. I have worked with students from all different cultures and it’s important to have books that reflect the background of every classroom. Rice & Rocks is a book that should be in elementary classrooms and libraries because it addresses important themes that impact all children.

Friendship

Kids of all ages always worry about what their friends will think about them. Giovanni demonstrates this by worrying if his friends won’t like his grandmother’s Jamaican dish because it is different. Children experience this every day and can connect to Giovanni on multiple levels.

Rice & Rocks last pageFamily Traditions and Culture

Every family has their own way of doing things. Whether it’s a special morning routine or having Sunday dinner to catch up. For many children the only family traditions they know are their own, so it’s important to expose kids to other ways whenever possible. Tradition often includes cultural foods and customs, especially if it is a celebration. Rice & Rocks does a beautiful job of introducing children to Jamaican, Puerto Rican, Japan, and southern American culture and cuisine.

I personally loved how Richards intertwined various traditions in an easy to understand manner that was fun and imaginative. By doing so, children learn about other parts of the world, languages, traditions, and food all in a beautiful picture book. The text is easy for young children to understand (Richards provides great explanations) and the illustrations also provide children with great visuals to help with comprehension. This book could be used for so many different concepts at home and at school.

Anything But Pink Book Review

I am so excited to share my thoughts on this diverse book with you! Disclaimer: I was provided a copy of this book from the author to facilitate this review.  As always, all opinions are my own and are not influenced in any way. I received a free copy of Anything But Pink written and illustrated by Adelina Winfield. I recommend using this book in the classroom and at home for grades P-2.

I’m going to be honest, I broke one of my classroom reading rules with this book because I chose it for the title. I LOVE pink, so when I had the opportunity to review this book I jumped on it immediately. Here is a look at my favorite page :).

Pink

Anything But Pink is a beautifully illustrated story about a family who does not want their daughter, Starri, to wear pink as a baby because they want her to be different. As Starri grows up, she wants to wear only pink and her parents teach her that “variety is the spice of life” by encouraging her to wear all of the colors of the rainbow.

Since having my daughter I have become immersed in children’s books and have come to appreciate the overall themes these books often carry. Even though I am one of those moms that made Molly a pink nursery, I can appreciate the lesson the parents in the book are trying to teach Starri. The book teaches children to be open and try new things. Starri does this when she adds other colors to her pink outfits and finds she loves the changes. Some kids really struggle with trying new things, and this book does a lovely job of showing parents working together to teach their daughter an important life lesson. Anything But Pink Family

 

This book is also a great example of using diversity in children’s books by including a mixed family. As a reading specialist, one of the things I look for when choosing books for my students is that my kids are represented in what they are reading. This book does a flawless job of incorporating diversity on a level that young readers can understand.

 

Using Zinnia and the Bees in the Classroom

Last week I posted a book review of Zinnia and the Bees by Danielle Davis. I really enjoyed this book, and while I was reading I had a bunch of different ideas go through my head about incorporating it into the classroom or homeschool curriculum. Today, I want to share my ideas. This post is for educators and homeschool families.

Reading the Text

Depending on your curriculum and classroom structure, this book may fit best as a whole class read aloud. I would try and pair it up with other texts that revolve around friendship, family, environment or nature since those are the biggest themes present.

Pairing Fiction with Nonfiction

Since the introduction of the Common Core, there has been a push for pairing fiction texts with nonfiction texts. Zinnia and the Bees provides a great connection for this with the concept of migratory bees.

After doing a little bit of research, I came across a perfect article to introduce and explain the importance of migratory beekeeping. The Mind-Boogling Math of Migratory Beekeeping is a fantastic article from 2013 that dives into detail about bees and the impacts they have on our food. This text is a little challenging because of all the math included, so I would suggest doing a partner or whole-class read with the article. Kids should also highlight the text for information they find interesting or important. After kids read and highlight, I would suggest having them complete reading questions (click here) to solidify their understanding of the material.

Some other ideas for infusing nonfiction with this text:

-online scavenger hunt about bees

-research project on current situation with migratory bees

-compare and contrast migratory bees in other countries

Discussing the Book

One of my favorite aspects about this book is the diversity of themes that it covers. You can do whole class or small group discussions about the following themes:

-Bullying

-Friendship

-Family

-Environment

-Death

-Trust

-Change

If you use this for a read aloud, try asking a theme related question each day (trust me there is lots of material) to help generate discussions.

Zinnia and the Bees Book Review

I recently joined a group of book bloggers to write reviews for children’s books. I am so excited to share my first one with all of you! Disclaimer: I was provided a copy of this book from the author to facilitate this review.  As always, all opinions are my own and are not influenced in any way. I received a free copy of Zinnia and the Bees by Danielle Davis. This book is definitely for kids ages 9-12 with the themes, problems, and vocabulary used, which is also why I really wanted to read it.

Zinnia is a young lady going into eighth grade who is dealing with a lot. She feels she has been isolated from her group of best friends, her mom is always working as a dentist or a community leader, a boy moved in next door for the summer, and her brother just left. In addition, she also has a hive of bees in her hair.

The book was really easy to read, the pacing was on point and the plot was entertaining. I read it in two sittings, but I am also a really fast reader. The chapters were a great length with cute little chapter titles. I normally read YA, so I am used to the structure and typical story patterns that authors use. I can honestly say that this one was a game changer.

The point of view is first person Zinnia, until it shifts every few chapters to the point of view of bees. I have read many books where there are multiple point of views, but this one is very different in a positive way. The author not only uses the bees to express their feelings on being insects, but infuses nonfiction facts into the thought process. “Not the ancestors who traveled across the Atlantic in 1622 in the straw hives of English colonists to become the first Americans of their kind, but the many who came after them.” (page 31). This type of writing puts a spin on delivering factual information to children. It is a great way for young readers to learn facts without trying to navigate through nonfiction text features.

Also, the author took it a step further. Not only did she share information about bees, she provided a different perspective on the treatment of nature in our society, which is a current trend. In the last six months, I have personally seen the concern about the bee population skyrocket. Davis introduces readers to the real life situation that many of these bees face. “We were commercial, migratory bees. In other words, were were not out there on our own, free. We were rentals. We were tended by beekeepers who employed us to pollinate food for humans.” (page 29). This different approach of incorporating an alternate point of view was a risk, but Davis really made it something memorable.

As a middle school language arts teacher, I tend to read books with the approach of how I can use it in the classroom. I constantly look for themes and this book has some really great ones for kids ages 9-12. However, I found that each theme was made up of multiple layers, which helped create complexity. This book could have very well have been an easy read, but Davis infused such intricate components that it made the reader think while reading. Some of the big themes include: friendship, family, trust, death, freedom and environment.

The complexity of Zinnia’s character is also something to be noted. It was incredible to watch her unfold and persevere through her struggles during her summer vacation. She did have a few vulnerable moments, which added to the realism of the story, but she continued to push through and keep going.

Zinnia is also a very different type of girl. She loves to knit and has a fantastic relationship with her brother. She is not obsessed with her cellphone or social media. She reminded me of a girl during the 90s and early 2000s who played outside and didn’t rely on technology to entertain her (my kind of girl). I think that when girls read this book it will encourage them to do something artistic (draw, sew, paint) and to get away from the technology.

Overall, this book touches on so many aspects of life for kids ages 9-12, but it also hits on different trends our society is currently facing. If this book was in my classroom library I know it would be a hard one to keep on the shelf.

 

Hidden Gems

I find the majority of people purchase books on Amazon (myself included), but there are times when I love to browse in a bookstore. In my travels I’ve come across some awesome small bookstores that remind me why I love reading so much. Small, independent stores stock books I probably wouldn’t look at in a Barnes and Nobles because there is so much too look at. The hole in the wall stores narrow down their focus to books guaranteed to engage readers of all ages. Sadly, these small stores don’t exist in my part of New Jersey, so when I find one during my travels my husband knows to expect new books to come home with us.

Front

As parents and educators, while it’s convenient to order books online from Amazon, Barnes and Nobles, and Usborne Books & More, going to small bookstores allow kids to explore books in a quiet setting. They can interact with new books and genres, and spend a few quiet minutes reading a few pages to see if they like the book. Many of these small bookstores also offer story time and sell cute stuffed animals that make great book buddies. The people who work and own these stores are also extremely knowledgeable and clearly book lovers.

 

This past weekend wasn’t super hot in New Jersey, so we drove up to Peddler’s Village in Pennsylvania. We have gone there a few times, but never with Molly. I really wanted to get her a new toy and there was a toy store where we were headed called JaZams.

Educational BooksNever did I expect to fall in love with a store so much. While we looked at the toys, Sticker BooksI noticed a few Usborne books and immediately got excited. They had a few educational books and a nice variety of sticker and activity books. This was one reason to love the store, but then we went to the other side where the books were located.

They had at least 100 boardbooks for little ones on all different topics that included classic and modern stories.  They also had the new Usborne Beauty and the Beast book
(that is gorgeous in person) and bathtub books.

At this point I was more excited than any young child in there, until I saw the section for toddlers-YA, which is when I wanted to move in. The bookshelves were filled and organized and nestled int he middle were two window seats for readers to utilize. As with the infant books, the children’s section had a great variety of classic and modern books. The decorations also promoted reading and added to the cozy atmosphere.

So while it is convenient and cheaper to buy books online, nothing beats the experience of going to a small bookstore.