Nikeriff Book Review

Disclaimer: I was provided a copy of this book from the author to facilitate this review. As always, all opinions are my own and are not influenced in any way.

With Molly in preschool, I’ve really been trying to boost her home library with alphabet books. She can sing the alphabet, but we’re still working on letter recognition. So when I came across a Facebook post from a mom who wrote an alphabet book I had to reach out.

Nikeriff, by Natasha Barber and illustrated by Rayah James, is a heartwarming and lovable alphabet picture  book that takes readers on an adventure.

First, I have to address the name Nikeriff. Barber starts off the story with a note to readers explaining that her autistic son came up with the name. Right away I thought this was a fabulous personal touch and made me feel connected to the author as a mom.

Readers are introduced to the little monster, Nikeriff, who is having a difficult time remembering the letters in the alphabet. He asks his mom and dad for help and they give him the supplies he needs for a scavenger hunt. Nikeriff spends the rest of the story with his trusty teddy bear going through the woods and collecting different elements from nature (animals, insects, plants) and practicing the letters of the alphabet.

What grabbed my attention right away was the more complex sentence structure. Usually when I read alphabet books the sentences are simple and short, with the letter bolded and enlarged, usually in a brighter color font. This picture book includes more complex sentences, which makes the story feel less babyish. The letters are bolded and enlarged, but don’t really distract the reader from the rest of the text or pictures. Personally, I LOVED this writing style because it means the book can be used with older kids who may need support with alphabet work. Since I work with lots of special education students, this is super exciting for me because finding texts like this is quite challenging.

Similar to the sentence structure, I also found the animals and insects added to the sac to be super creative. I love that it included critters such as the “Underwing moth” and “Queen Butterfly”. While there were some traditional ones included, like ants, this hint of creativity not only helped the flow of the story, but it was incredibly engaging.

I was also a huge fan of the idea of a scavenger hunt, especially that it took place in the woods. Many kids are fascinated by animals, bugs and the outdoors, so the setting of this story can really engage readers who gravitate towards those topics. This also allows the book to be utilized in schools as a cross curricular text for science, specifically in preschool and kindergarten.

Finally, the illustrations were absolutely spot on! I truly enjoyed looking at each picture and felt that they matched the feel of the text. I love that they look like they were drawn with crayon, especially after the author’s note in the beginning. It just made me feel like i was reading a book imagined by a child, which leaves me feeling all warm and fuzzy.

I highly recommend this book for kids ages 0-8, but it can be used with older students working on basic reading skills.

To purchase the book click here 

To follow Nikeriff on Facebook click here

Unicorn Growing Up Grateful Book Review

I currently work with a very special population of students who are all classified, and many deal with anxiety, depression etc. When I meet one-on-one with these students, they are usually very negative and have a hard time finding positivity in their lives. I try my best to provide them with positive reinforcement, but they often have a hard time accepting it.

Unicorn Growing Up Grateful is a journal that children can use to record positive aspects of their daily lives. There are a few different journal options to choose depending on the individual child that will be using it. The two themes are unicorns or dinosaurs. There are also two versions- one for students with disabilities or writing difficulties, and one for students who can write.

Here are the links to the four journals:
For the child who can write:
Unicorn
For the disabled child or young one not yet learned how to write:
Unicorn
Dinosaur

 

I work with students with disabilities and dysgraphia, so I chose the unicorn journal for that population of children. Visually, the journal looks like a coloring book with adorable images of a cuddly unicorn.

One of the best tools to offer students with writing disabilities is a graphic organizer. The organizer provides lots of space for a student to write or draw each day. There is a space to practice writing the date and a sentence starter for what a child is grateful for that day. My favorite aspect of the organizer is the happiness scale. Kids draw the mouth on the unicorn to indicate how happy they were that day. There is also a section for kids to reflect on the best part of their day.

I see this product being used more at home than in school. The book is a 66 page habit forming journal, so it can be used effectively during after school hours. Personally, I would have my child complete a page in the journal after dinner during reading time. Kids can use crayons,  markers, or colored pencils to color and fill in the graphic organizer while we talk about their day. I can see this as being a very powerful tool to help kids reflect on the day, their actions, etc., and to recognize the positive moments that happen every day.

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