How Do I Become an Online Teacher?

I’ve been an online English teacher with Edmentum for the last three years. When I first started looking I was home with a new baby, I had just resigned from my classroom teaching job and I wanted a job working from home. I would literally job hunt all day every day, with my resume ready to be submitted to an employer at a moment’s notice.

Over the years I’ve shared my experiences and knowledge with friends and co-workers who are interested in a part-time job for extra spending money, or who are looking to make a change and leave the brick and mortar classroom.

With so many teachers and parents looking for work from home jobs in today’s world, I wanted to share my journey of what I have learned about getting a job as an online teacher.

  1. Job search engines are AMAZING. My job searches always started with a trip to indeed.com. In truth, since I started using indeed about 5 years ago I was hired for three different jobs using this incredible website. Playing around with the key word searches was also really important since I was looking for very specific positions. ‘Remote teaching jobs’ wasn’t as successful for me as ‘online reading teacher’. Jobs are literally updated all day every day, so I would check my recent searches multiple times a day. The second you see a job that you are seriously interested in, APPLY! Have all of your documents ready to go (references, letters of recommendation, certifications, resume, etc.). Some companies will contact you the same day and others may take a day or two, if you hear from them at all. I also suggest keeping a document listing what job you applied for and the company. When you apply to more than two or three it’s very easy to get them mixed up.
  2. Teaching English to children overseas. Once you find some job listings, it’s important to be aware of the different types of online teaching jobs available. One of the most popular part time jobs is working for companies like GOGOKID and VIPKid. These companies will oftentimes give you the lesson plans and materials, but it’s up to the teacher to incorporate props and engage students. Teachers control their calendar and students sign up for sessions where there are openings. Ratings and teacher feedback are very important for these positions. As a secondary teacher, while I did apply to VIPKids, I never went through the entire process because I knew I wouldn’t be a good fit. I am friends with teachers who work for these companies and see how passionate they are about working with their students. Just a little heads up, these jobs typically happen early in the morning (like 5 am ish).
  3. Online school companies. Back in 2014, I worked in a building with a supervisor who also taught part time for K12. When I started my online job hunt I started with K12. I wasn’t qualified for any of their open positions (more on this in a second), so I started looking at other companies. Along with K12, Edmentum and Connections Academy are other popular online schools. As an employee of Edmentum, I can only speak on their requirements and expectations. I was first hired as a contractor (part time and without benefits), then I switched to full time (with benefits) and I currently work as a contractor again (by choice). During my time as an Edmentor, along with teaching, I have co-hosted a PD session on Accommodating Special Education Students in the Virtual Classroom, attended IEP meetings, participated in curriculum committee meetings, collaborated with sales and marketing, and more.
  4. Making sure you’re qualified. One of the biggest lessons I have learned is the importance of multiple state certifications. Why? Every state is different in their teacher requirements. Edmentum works with schools literally all over the world, and have to follow specific guidelines when hiring teachers. For instance, in order to teach students in Indiana you need an Indiana certification. I was hired by Edmentum to teach New Jersey students, which was the only certification I had at the time. My Instructional Leader had me get my Michigan license so I could work full time with a school there. I was also told to get certifications for Indiana and Illinois because that’s what the company needed me to get. Some states will make you get fingerprinted, even though the job is for an online company, and even CPR certification. It’s also up to you to make sure keep your certifications up to date. As a heads up, some companies require that you live in the state you are teaching in, like K12 (which is why I wasn’t qualified from earlier). So before you fill out a job application make sure you read the job requirements.
  5. Creating your own courses. If you’re looking for a more flexible online teaching job, I would suggest taking a look at Outschool. Teachers create all kinds of classes for all ages. I keep seeing ads for princess Sing-a-long tea parties in my Facebook feed for Outschool. Personally, I have never worked for taken a course through this platform, but I see lots of parents talking about it in Facebook groups.

Little Reading Coach is a certified Teacher of English (K-12) and Reading Specialist (P-12) offering online reading,  writing and home-based learning support tutoring services for students in grades 6-12. For more information click here.

How to Provide Quality Feedback on Virtual Assignments

I’m an English teacher. I grade A LOT of student writing. When I was in brick and mortar classrooms, writing assignments, process pieces and projects had rubrics with lots of comments written in cursive (it was much faster than writing in print). Unfortunately, I can’t necessarily do this quickly in the virtual classroom.

As teachers, time is precious, and grading is one aspect of our lives that takes the most time.

Today, I want to share how I provide quality feedback to my online Edmentum students in grades 6-12 .

  1. Start with a quick message. Being virtual, it’s imperative that we do our best to create relationships with students. This can even be done while grading. When a student submits an assignment to me, I always start with a quick message. For a discussion response, I say, “Thank you for your response. Please check your email for the rubric.” For activities (projects/essays/presentations), I say, “Thank you for submitting this assignment to me.” I like to set a nice tone before I dive into their performance on the task .
  2. Tell them the score. For all graded activities, I include a short line about the points they earned out of the possible points. For discussions, I say, “You have earned a ____ out of 12, which is a _____%.” For unit activities, I say for each task,” Score: __ out of 4″. This is really what students want to know and it provides for a smooth transition into the next few steps.
  3. Provide a scored rubric. To me, this has been a game changer for my students. For discussion responses, I highlight the rubric based on the response, and save it as a PDF. I email the discussion rubrics and feedback to my kids because there’s no way to attach it to the discussion in the module. For activities, in the feedback text box I copy and paste the score a student earned on the rubric and place it right under where I say the score. Doing this helps my kiddos understand why they earned the score they got and it also backs up the next step.
  4. Write a specific Oreo statement. This is by far the most effective way I have learned to provide my students with feedback. I like to think of an Oreo when writing to my kids- compliment, suggestions, end on a positive note. I start by always find something to praise the student for (word choice, answering all parts of the prompt, liking their idea, they made a good point, etc.). Then I dive into my specific reasons why they lost points and how they can improve. Just by adding these few sentences has saved me time with back and forth messages/calls/emails with students and parents, and has increased the amount re-submissions I receive. Finally, I end by saying nice, good, great or fabulous job based on the score the student earned. By doing the Oreo, I’m praising my student, providing constructive feedback and ending with a smile.

How to word constructive criticism

It’s all about the wording.

I have a tendency to repeat myself when I grade, which also helps make the process go faster. I focus on three categories (which happen to be the ones on the discussion rubric) answering all parts of the prompt, providing textual evidence/examples and explanations, and spelling and grammar.

If a student gives me a sentence or two and only focuses on the first part of a prompt with some spelling and grammar mistakes, this is what I normally write:

In the future, make sure you answer all parts of the prompt, elaborate on your ideas with specific examples and explanations and proofread your work for spelling and grammatical errors.

Then, I get down to the nitty gritty in the next few sentences.

For instance, you did not discuss what qualities the character has that you would like to have as well. Also, what did this character do in the book that showed she was brave? How does she support her friends?

I really try to be as specific with my questions to my students as possible, because I know this is how they will go back and revise their work. By asking questions, I’m giving students guidance in the direction I want them to tweak their work while also getting them to think about adding specific details to their writing.

Providing quality feedback does take time, but getting into a routine and having some solid wording, can make a big difference.

Little Reading Coach is a certified Teacher of English (K-12) and Reading Specialist (P-12) offering online reading,  writing and home-based learning support tutoring services for students in grades 6-12. For more information click here.

Resources for Teaching Reading Online

 

As a middle and high school teacher, I was never really given a reading program to use with my students. I loved this flexibility,  but it was time consuming to find the resources I wanted to use with my students.

As many educators are putting together their own collection of online reading resources, I wanted to share my experiences with ones that have helped my readers.  I have used these programs with general education students, special education and honors students.

Raz-kids– This is an awesome online reading program. I love that students have access to their account 24/7 and that parents can see what their student is reading. This site is great for students in grades K-6. I did use this for my readers in 6th grade and some of them were too advanced for the program, so I gave them a supplemental novel to focus on instead. The leveled libraries are filled with a mixture of fiction and nonfiction texts that require students to read each work multiple times by listening to it and reading it independently. The comprehension quizzes focus on specific topics (characterization, plot, cause and effects) so teachers are able to really see the areas of strengths and weaknesses. The system also creates progress reports based on this data, which I’ve actually used in parent conferences.

Teachers do have the ability to conduct running record assessments with the program as well. I have used some of the passages, but have never had students record themselves with the software.

ReadWorks– I found ReadWorks when I first started teaching in 2010 and have used it since. This is one of those rare programs that can be used with grades K-12. The site has SO many filer options for finding the perfect text. Users can search using Lexile levels, grade level, fiction/nonfiction, content type, activity type, etc. I typically use grade or Lexile level and fiction/nonfiction to find the passages I want. Users can listen to an audio version and/or read the text independently before tackling some reading comprehension questions. Being super honest, I wish that the questions were a little more challenging at times, especially for the older grades, but these work really well for my population of students.

While teachers can print the passages and questions, you can also set up online classrooms through the site and electronically assign students assignments. I have used this feature tutoring and it was super easy to navigate and access.

Reading Detective by The Critical Thinking Co.- This is hands down my FAVORITE  resource to use with my kiddos. Each passage is one page and has a page of questions that accompany it. The questions are absolutely incredible by requiring readers to use their higher thinking skills. The questions also constantly ask for textual evidence to support answers, expecting students to look at specific sentences and paragraphs.

I’m currently using the traditional book version, and using my document camera or taking pictures on my phone of passages. However, the company offers e-book, win software and app versions that I will definitely be looking into in the next few weeks to make my life easier.

Vooks– I came across Vooks earlier this year when I saw they were doing free accounts for teachers. This resource is geared towards preschool and elementary aged kiddos, so I don’t use it as much with my students. Each book is read aloud and students watch the book come to life through video. It feels like like a mix between a read aloud and watching a cartoon, which is really cool for readers.

Epic– this is a one of a kind resource. It’s a digital library for grades P-6 that includes popular texts for students to read. It includes works such as Fancy Nancy, Frog and Toad and Ella Enchanted. I would recommend using this program for mini lessons and activities.

 

Little Reading Coach is a certified Teacher of English (K-12) and Reading Specialist (P-12) offering online reading and writing tutoring services for students in grades 3-12. For more information click here.